Sin City

Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez’s Sin City is pretty ugly. What do I mean by that oxymoron? Just imagine watching a dog eats your flesh, but in a black and white silhouette comical style. Sin City is disgustingly violence, yet aesthetically elegance at the same time. Watching this film is like pumping doses of adrenaline rush into my system, and my eyes are nailed to the screen for two hours straight.

Even before the first scene appears, the title sequence is striking. While the typography travels stylistically in and out of the screen, the fusion of techno and jazz added both hip and elegancy into the motion. The film then opens with a gorgeous black and white shot where a woman is standing on the balcony. The back of her dress is the only element lid in red. The soothing jazz groove in the background enhances the noir atmosphere. But the calming scene does not last for long before the film takes viewers on a much more chaotic ride where heroes, whores, blood, breasts, guns, thongs, bondages, classic cars, and much more to be discovered in Sin City.

The structure of Sin City reminds me of Aimee Phan’s book, We Should Never Meet. The three mesmerizing tales unfolded on their own, but with a clever and subtle connection between the three. They all work together beautifully. Although the casts have short screen time, they hold up the pace well. Devon Aoki is a lovely addition to the bunch. She is cute, and she kicks ass. Quentin Tarantino is credited as a special guest director. It isn’t hard to tell which part he has contributed since he is obsessed with martial arts. Beside the stories and the casts, the special effects and the cinematography are exceptional. From a designer point of view, the level of details and the juxtaposition angles are invigorating.

Aside from the misogyny – I don’t take joy in beating up women, especially from the hero and the cop – Sin City is an amazing work of art. Unless you have no taste in computer-generated motion graphics, don’t miss the aesthetic experience. It is a fantastic escapism.

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